Chrome: Prevent the Gnome-Keyring Dialogue (Chrome and Chromium)

You have once again entered the Chrome world of survival horror… Good Luck…

For the purposes of this post, I’ll be referring to Chrome & Chromium as Chromium because Chromium is the open source code-base from which your Chrome is built and I use the “Chromium” build so it makes my life easier to just call them both Chromium. Apply your own changes where needed. Now, to get rid of that annoying prompt…

It’s come to my attention that this is very poorly documented and many people are left wondering, “How do I get rid of that annoying dialogue when Chrome (or Chromium) starts?”

Do not despair, it’s actually quite simple. For the purpose of this exercise, I’ll refer to Chrome as Chromium, but they are essentially the same browser (the precise differences have to do with licencing and who exactly builds it). In a nutshell, you use the --password-store=basic argument. There’s a little more detail below.

If you’re using a launcher (that means an icon you click on), simply right-click it and select “edit” or the nearest equivalent. Now add the following to the end of the path --password-store=basic (yes, the space). Obviously if you’re launching it via the CLI, you’d type chromium --password-store=basic and problem solved.

You may want to make this change permanent, in which case (reasonably savvy users only) will edit the chromium execute script itself. Depending on your distro, it may be in an alternative location, but generally it is /usr/bin/chromium. This file is a plain old shell script so editing it is simple, and I’ll make it even simpler by saving you the hassle of finding what to edit. The variable you want is CHROMIUM_FLAGS and all you need to do is append --password-store=basic to it, after everything else in the script has modified the variable. So place the following line:
CHROMIUM_FLAGS="$CHROMIUM_FLAGS --password-store=basic"
above the last if-block, which reads so:
if [ $want_debug -eq 1 ] ; then
Protip: You can add any other arguments you wish to make permanent to CHROMIUM_FLAGS.
Notes: There’s always a danger with messing with a software’s launch script. Be careful what you add. Backing up the script is always recommended.
Whenever you update Chromium, it’ll overwrite your changes.
Don’t forget that you need to be root :p

As usual, feel free to leave comments, ask questions, or post death threats using the comment button below. If you found this post useful, it’s good to share or like it, or even both.

Share the Love:

Easy Print:

Advertisements